Adler
BASE SEQUENCE COURSES

Base Sequence - Year One for full-time students (38 credits)  

Trimester I            - 6 courses / 11 MPsy required credits (+3 TQ credits)

Trimester II           - 6 courses / 14 MPsy required credits           

Trimester III          - 6 courses / 13 MPsy required credits           

Plus: Colloquia, portfolio seminar courses, and practicum readiness interview 

GP-500 Colloquia
(0 credits)

An all-day (6-hour) event, held once per trimester, required for all ADLER degree and graduate certificate students and faculty in all programs. Open to the public. Colloquia are intended to promote development of a professional community.

IP-510 Motivation & Values
(2 credits, 24 hours; prerequisite: none)
This four-day intensive course highlights student self-reflection as a foundation for the development of knowledge, skills, and mindset required for effective practice as a psychologist or psychotherapist. An introduction to neural, cognitive, emotional, and social (especially, in-group/out-group) factors in motivation and change provides an orientation for the clinical or counselling psychology or psychotherapy student. This extends and applies undergraduate foundational knowledge of cognitive-affective, social, and biological bases of behaviour. Role-play, peer coaching, and experiential exercises underline the importance of maintaining patterns of self-care and the need to assess and establish an interpersonal and intrapersonal resource base for effective service delivery. Assumptions and techniques of Adlerian psychotherapy serve as illustrative examples. Students identify their motivating values or highest-level goals. Graduating students present Comprehensive Examination (Capstone 3) material to help students in the course match their goals with career options as they identify their own “strengths and virtues” relevant to their career aspirations.

GP501, 502 & 503- Portfolio Seminars (0 credits, 12 hours) This three-trimester series of courses provides opportunities for collegial interaction in a small group setting led by an instructor who serves as each student’s Faculty Mentor-Advisor. Each trimester includes 4 hours of reflection on group dynamics and theory using the class as an example. Activities focus on the development of students’ self and self-and-other strengths related to professional goals, preparation for practicum, choice of educational and other experiences supporting their strengths and aspirations, identification of research interests, practice in collaboration, and completion of the Learning Portfolio due at the beginning of the last trimester of Base Year Sequence. Although there is no credit awarded for this series per se, 12 hours each trimester are “contributed” by other required courses that benefit from content integration during Portfolio sessions and assignments. 

NT-598 Practicum Readiness Interview (0 credits). Occurs at the end of first or beginning of second trimester of Base Sequence

Trimester I

(Pre-req) TQ-422: Brain & Behaviour (3 TQ credits)

GP-501 Portfolio Seminar I: Practicum Preparation
(0 credits, 12 hours; pre-requisite: none)

AS-531 Foundations of Psychometric Assessment
(3 credits, 30 hours plus 6 hours of Portfolio integration; prerequisite: none)
This course builds on the student’s understanding of basic statistics in order to apply the principles to psychometric methods. Topics include the construction and standardization of tests, the importance of reliability and validity, the administration of objective tests and measurements, an overview of strengths/weaknesses of various measures, an introduction to types and principles of test selection, the role of the test administrator, and diversity issues in the administration, scoring, results, and reporting of psychometric measures. Students will practice administering, scoring, and reporting on selected instruments in preparation for level C competency qualification.

NT-511 Interviewing & Alliance
(2 credits, 24 hours; prerequisite: none)
Skills taught in this course will serve as an integrative foundation throughout the program. Role-play, peer coaching, and experiential exercises will underline the importance of self-knowledge for maintaining patterns of self-care and the need to assess and establish an interpersonal and intrapersonal resource base for effective provision of psychotherapy. Students will learn basic interviewing skills through exercises including focusing, following, attending, paraphrasing, open questioning, and reflecting. They will be introduced to advanced skills including immediacy, bridging, discrepancy resolution, information giving, summarizing, closure, and repairing the therapeutic alliance. In three-person groups, students practice interviewing and rapport-building skills and elicit information for a Mental Status Examination.

RC-571 Foundations of Qualitative Inquiry
(2 credits, 24 hours; prerequisite: none)
The intention of this course is to introduce practice-based researchers to the fundamental principles of qualitative research, including learners interested in carrying out rigorous and relevant qualitative research. We will explore a variety of methodologies that enable researchers to investigate particular situations, circumstances, groups and individuals using a variety of questions and approaches. Such approaches will include ethnography, grounded theory, case study, narrative, phenomenological, and participatory action research, as well as feminist, race-based and decolonizing methods. We will also explore how relationships of power and privilege influence research undertakings, and discuss ethical considerations in research. In this course, students will also design a qualitative research proposal using one or more qualitative methodologies discussed in class. The course is intended to provide concepts, tools, practice, and experience to support completion of Capstone 2: Major Research Project or Thesis during Applied Sequence.

IP-521 History & Systems of Personality & Psychotherapy
(2 credits, 24 hours; prerequisite: none)
This course provides a comprehensive and in-depth survey and critique of the various methods, principles, and theories of modern and contemporary psychology as applied to the study and understanding of human development, personality, adjustment, psychopathology, and therapeutic interventions. Primary emphasis will be on the major areas of general psychological theory and personality development in the psychoanalytic, behavioural, humanistic, systems, and cognitive traditions offering a critique of the various theories, methods, and therapeutic models with precursors to psychopathology and adjustment. The various systems and paradigms that have historically emerged and continue to influence contemporary approaches and practices will be systematically and philosophically explored. Additionally, the historical context and influence of socio-political factors on the history and systems of personality and psychotherapy will be examined.

RC-574 Quantitative Analysis I
(1 credit, 12 hours; prerequisite: none)
The goal of RC-574 is to provide students with the conceptual foundations and tools of both research design/methodology and the application of basic statistics in psychological research. Emphasis will be on developing knowledge, understanding and skill in both the application of statistical techniques and in the critical evaluation of the analysis of results in published research and its interpretation. Moreover, unlike the statistics courses some of you may have taken previously which likely emphasized rote learning (e.g., requiring you to memorize formulae for specific tests), the emphasis in this course is on understanding why the formulae are what they are and how they work, as well as the strengths and limitations and the assumptions underlying the use of each statistic covered. Throughout the course examples will be drawn from a wide range of psychological inquiry. The series of courses is intended to provide concepts, tools, practice, and experience to support completion of Capstone 2: Major Research Project or Thesis during Applied Sequence.

Trimester II

GP-502 Portfolio Seminar II: Readiness for Applied Sequence
(0 credits; 12 hours; prerequisite: IP-501) 

DG-541 Psychopathology I: Cognitive, Psychotic, and Affective Disorders
(3 credits, 30 hours plus 6 hours of Portfolio integration; prerequisite: none)
This course will cover or review substantial foundational knowledge of psychology of the individual in relation to the conceptualization of mental disorders. It addresses the various cognitive, psychotic, and affective components of severe mental illness. Attention will be given to a comprehensive understanding of the phenomenology, psychodynamics, diagnostics, and clinical symptom profile of schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders, cognitive impairments and dementia, borderline conditions, and severe affective disorders including clinical depression, bipolar disorder, and the problem of suicide. Fundamental skills in conceptualization, case formulation, and the diagnostic criteria of the DSM-V classification system in relation to symptom clusters will be core competencies.

AS-532 Assessment of Intellect and Cognition
(3 credits, 30 hours plus 6 hours of Portfolio integration: prerequisite: AS-531)
This course is designed to explore the concepts of intelligence and cognition in adults; to analyze the issues and controversies related to assessment of intellectual and cognitive functioning; to develop competency in the administration, scoring, and interpretation of a variety of standardized intellectual assessment instruments (Wechsler, Stanford-Binet, etc.); to become familiar with other cognitive assessment approaches; and to consider the relationship of assessment to clinical practice.

 NT-522 Transtheoretic Foundations of Psychotherapy
(2 credits, 24 hours; prerequisite: NT-511)
This course follows Course NT-511 and serves as a more thorough introduction to a bio-psycho-social systems metatheory that serves as a foundation to psychotherapy practice. Students work in groups utilizing case-based learning (CBL—also known as project- or problem-based learning, PBL) to explore common factors (extratherapeutic, relationship, placebo, and technique) that contribute to psychotherapy outcome. Consideration of case examples and individual reflection on a selected technique support the development of more advanced clinical skills.

EH-512 Ethics and the Law
(3 credits, 36 hours; prerequisite: none)
The course will cover the two main factors governing the activities of health professionals practicing in Ontario. The first factor is the standards of professional conduct which have been established by law and which are enforced by licensing bodies. The second factor is comprised of the codes of ethics created by professional associations. The students will participate in activities designed to ensure that they will be able to use these two factors in their professional practice so they deliver the highest quality service to their clients/patients. Topics include ethical standards, privacy, confidentiality, credentialing, mental health codes and legislation, certification and licensure, professional organizations, and insurance in various settings such as hospitals, clinics, private practice, schools, business and industry, government, and community.

IP-524 Social Dimensions of Therapy
(1 credit, 12 hours; prerequisite: none)
In every nation, the rate of mental illness rises in direct proportion to the level of income inequality. Yet psychotherapy rarely considers the impact of social context on mental health. The result is attribution error: the clients’ behaviours are viewed as poor choices or character defects rather than as reasonable responses to unreasonable social conditions. In order to facilitate the therapist-client alliance, therapists must understand, and be able to explain to their clients, the impact of social conditions on mental health. Topics include: the social determinants of health; why most clients are women; how oppressive conditions generate intra-personal and interpersonal conflict; and responding to internalized oppression.

RC-575 Quantitative Analysis II
(1 credit, 12 hours; prerequisite: RC-574)
RC-575 builds on RC-574 and, as with RC-574, aims to provide students with the conceptual foundations and tools of both research design/methodology and the application of statistics in psychological research. In this course, we cover more advanced statistics. Throughout the course examples will be drawn from a wide range of psychological inquiry. As with RC-574, emphasis will be on developing knowledge, understanding and skill in both the application of statistical techniques and in the critical evaluation of the analysis of results in published research and its interpretation. The series of courses is intended to provide concepts, tools, practice, and experience to support completion of Capstone 2: Major Research Project or Thesis during Applied Sequence.

Trimester III

GP-503 Portfolio Seminar III: Identification of Research Interests
(0 credits, 12 hours; prerequisite: IP-502)

DG-542 Psychopathology II: Anxiety-Based and Personality Disorders
(3 credits, 30 hours plus 6 hours of Portfolio integration; prerequisite: DG-541)
This course will cover or review substantial foundational knowledge of psychology of the individual in relation to the conceptualization of mental disorders. Theories of anxiety will be reviewed in order to develop an understanding of symptoms of anxiety including panic attacks, obsessive-compulsive, anxiety and phobia. Their etiology or origin in earlier developmental conflicts will be discussed and the role developmental issues play in the formation of anxiety will be explored from various points of view. The role of accidental and structural trauma will be discussed. Symptoms of PTSD will be reviewed and explored in light of structural issues. The course will also provide an in-depth understanding of various personality disorders including clusters A B and C, in terms of self-organization, attachment, affect, and defense mechanisms. Treatment considerations will be reviewed in light of each personality structure. Formulations of anxiety will be addressed from the perspective of various personality disorders.

AS-533 Assessment of Personality and Psychopathology
(3 credits, 30 hours plus 6 hours of Portfolio integration: prerequisite: AS-532)
This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts and applications of personality assessment. The main focus will be on the administration and interpretation of objective assessments and, to a lesser extent, projective tests. This course is intended to provide grounding in theory and concepts relevant to objective personality assessment, as well as to build skills needed to administer, score, and interpret prominent personality inventories. This course is hands-on, intensive, and cumulative in order to promote learning and skill building that will generalize to ‘real world’ practice.

NT-513 Safe & Effective Use of Self in Therapy
(2 credits, 24 hours, prerequisite: NT-522 or equivalent)
The therapist’s degree of self-awareness, self-regulation and self-development has a major impact on therapeutic outcome. To enhance these abilities, students must examine their beliefs, behaviours, and blind spots. This four-day course is divided into four topics: responding to clients’ sexual concerns; balancing your needs and your clients’ needs; the wounded helper; and identifying and escaping therapy traps. Objective: the student will meet the core competencies in the safe and effective use of self in psychotherapy and other psychological services.

EH-516 Professional Communication and Record-Keeping
(2 credits, 24 hours; prerequisite: EH-512)
This course will address the legal and professional obligations of regulated health professionals and other healthcare workers (including students and non-regulated mental health care professionals) regarding the use of the Internet for communication, data storage, and marketing. Topics that will be covered include differentiating between the privacy and confidentiality of personal health information, disclosure and associated legislation such as the Regulated Health Professional Acts and the Personal Health Information Protection Act, 2004 (PHIPA); and record retention and security. Students

AS-523 Human Developmental & Change Processes(2 credits)
(2 credits, 24 hours; prerequisite: none)

This course covers substantial foundational knowledge of learning as an aspect of change, including classical and operant conditioning, the role of expectations and goals, modeling, and cognitive styles. Cognitive elements of attention, perception, and memory are reviewed. Developmental change processes are discussed, focusing on an integration of neurobiological and social factors. Advanced topics of development across the lifespan are explored through the perspective of current brain research, including contributions of nature and nurture, evolutionary biology, barriers to learning, attachment, the development of personality, positive and negative influences on individual behaviour, violence, intelligence, and happiness. Instructor: M. Elmpak

RC-576 Quantitative Analysis III
(1 credit, 12 hours; prerequisite: RC-575)
RC-576 builds on RC-574 and RC-575, with the overall aim of providing students with the conceptual foundations and tools of both research design/methodology and the application of statistics in psychological research. In this course, we cover even more advanced statistics than previously. Throughout the course examples will be drawn from a wide range of psychological inquiry. As with RC-574 and RC-575, emphasis will be on developing knowledge, understanding and skill in both the application of statistical techniques and in the critical evaluation of the analysis of results in published research and its interpretation. The series of courses is intended to provide concepts, tools, practice, and experience to support completion of Capstone 2: Major Research Project or Thesis during Applied Sequence.

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